Pilgrims On The Way http://pilgrimsontheway.com Historic Apostolic, Reformation Christianity Thu, 02 Nov 2017 17:12:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 90 Days … of Wisdom for the Christian life http://pilgrimsontheway.com/3357/90-days-wisdom-christian-life/ http://pilgrimsontheway.com/3357/90-days-wisdom-christian-life/#respond Mon, 13 Feb 2017 01:24:37 +0000 http://pilgrimsontheway.com/?p=3357 This book on wisdom is meant to take the reader through 90 days of Bible study, reflection, and prayer for a section of John’s gospel, Paul’s letter to the Romans, and James’ letter. It was furnished for review gratis by an excellent publisher, The Good Book Company and Cross-Focused Reviews. […]

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Keller & Allberry Wisdom

Keller & Allberry Wisdom

This book on wisdom is meant to take the reader through 90 days of Bible study, reflection, and prayer for a section of John’s gospel, Paul’s letter to the Romans, and James’ letter. It was furnished for review gratis by an excellent publisher, The Good Book Company and Cross-Focused Reviews. Thank you.

On the plus side, the authors seem orthodox in their grasp of Scripture and the resulting theology / doctrine that authentically flows from that. This book would be useful as a light, very basic introduction to those important portions of Scripture. Also format and production qualities are good.

But for me, due to its introductory level it was not too compelling being primarily suitable for those newer to the faith. Overall ~ 3.3 stars I suppose. Both authors have written other useful, helpful works.

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Martin Luther, Simonetta Carr http://pilgrimsontheway.com/3344/martin-luther/ http://pilgrimsontheway.com/3344/martin-luther/#respond Thu, 15 Dec 2016 00:28:33 +0000 http://pilgrimsontheway.com/?p=3344 OVERVIEW OF MARTIN LUTHER:   This book (on Martin Luther) is another in Simonetta Carr’s carefully researched, well vetted / written / produced series “Christian Biographies for Young Readers”. It displays the same meticulous research, helpful photos and drawings, and excellent production values found in the other volumes of this […]

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OVERVIEW OF MARTIN LUTHER:  Martin Luther, Carr

This book (on Martin Luther) is another in Simonetta Carr’s carefully researched, well vetted / written / produced series “Christian Biographies for Young Readers”. It displays the same meticulous research, helpful photos and drawings, and excellent production values found in the other volumes of this series. Additionally, at the end it includes 5 pages of vignettes, a timeline of Martin Luther’s life, a three Q&As from Luther’s Small Catechism. A copy of this book was provided gratis by Reformation Heritage Press and Cross-Focused Reviews for a review – thank you!

INTERACTION:  One of the helpful things about Ms. Carr’s books is the pertinent historical context and detail she gives, along with facts and events of the subject’s life, thinking, motives, actions, and emotions. I gleaned some valuable bits of historical information about Dr. Luther and the cultural, theological setting of ~ 16th century central Germany in which he found himself. At that time, the culture of Western Europe was being greatly impacted by a new technology (the printing press which revolutionized access to knowledge, much like the computers / internet revolution of our day), leading directly led to seminal artistic, scientific, philosophical, and theological inquiry and thinking. Those changes were to blow the doors off the well-advanced devolution / corruption of Christian thinking, worship, and living that had gradually accrued over the preceding millennium or so, most clearly embodied in the dominant Roman Catholic theology, dogma, practices, and ethics.

CONCLUSION:  Considering the current, widespread historical ignorance of our Christian heritage and teaching (not to mention of history in general), this book is a small but needed antidote that will help children and adults form a more accurate understanding and appreciation of one important person God used in the New Testament church to effect a radical, much needed reformation of thinking and practice. Overall, it is hard to find any negatives in this book, although perhaps a Luther scholar might want to include, exclude, or change some things. But it serves its teaching purpose very well for its target audience. As with her other books, highly recommended.

QUOTES / RESOURCES:  “More and more he realized that the ‘righteousness of God’ (in Romans 1:17) … is not a righteousness that God demands, but a righteousness God gives in Jesus Christ … Little did he realize … that the doctrine of justification by faith alone would become the foundation of what later would be called the Protestant faith” P. 24

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Good and Angry, Powlison http://pilgrimsontheway.com/3331/good-and-angry-powlison/ http://pilgrimsontheway.com/3331/good-and-angry-powlison/#respond Mon, 19 Sep 2016 03:37:52 +0000 http://pilgrimsontheway.com/?p=3331 OVERVIEW: Do you have an anger problem?  Are you an angry person down deep?  If you said no, you may not know yourself very well.  Now we have this excellent, insightful book from Dr. Powlison, a counselor of 40 years who in ~ 230 pages (4 sections and 17 chapters) […]

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OVERVIEW:

Do you have an anger problem?  Are you an angry person down deep?  If you said no, you may not know yourself very well.  Now we have this excellent, insightful book from Dr. Powlison, a counselor of 40 years who in ~ 230 pages (4 Good and Angrysections and 17 chapters) skillfully merges sound psychological, biblical, and theological insight focused on this divine characteristic (wholly good, positive, constructive, and essential) and also a major, inherent human attribute that for us has both positive and negative outworkings (in our experience generally of destructive or mixed effect due to the ubiquitously, pervasively dysfunctional nature of our current condition).  Powlison attempts to help us understand what anger is, how we wrongly, destructively engage in it, and how it can be rightly done as we imitate God in His divine, unchanging nature, as solely lived out in human perfection by Jesus of Nazareth, the heaven-sent Son of God, 2nd member of the divine trinity, the God-man Himself.  This book was provided to me gratis by the publisher and Cross-Focused Reviews in exchange for an unbiased review.  Thanks you.

SUMMARY / INTERACTION:

The first section (three chapters) covers our experiences of anger, telling of its powerful effect on us and our relationships, whether vertical or horizontal.  Our anger can negatively express itself in obvious ways such as murder, rage, arguing, seeking revenge, tantrums, and fighting or in milder, less obvious ways such as brooding, whining, sighing, irritability, bitterness, being critical / judgmental, complaining, or indifference.  But it can also manifest in positive ways as we react well and in a godly manner to genuine wrongs, injustices, etc.  We all do anger differently at different times, exploding, simmering, becoming embittered, repressing, etc. but we have our own primary forms of expressing it.  “Good and angry is the polar opposite of all forms of bad and angry, and it acts constructively in the presence of (actual) wrong.” p. 38

Chapter two consists of just one word “Yes.” as it answers the chapter title “Do You Have a Serious Anger Problem?”  an Important question to reflect on in becoming deeply honest and insightful if we are ever to admit that we need help and in clearly understanding the ultimate source of that help even though such help is generally manifest via natural means.

Chapter three addresses six general responses we adopt regarding the issue of anger, showing the degree of truth involved in each position assumed and how each approach does not get it right in full.  Sometimes we actually are more on the receiving end of anger done poorly, destructively, even dangerously, being more victims than victimizers (although every one of us is both in varying degrees at different times).  He quotes Francis of Assisi’s well-known prayer which is ok I suppose but rather bland and lacking in biblical comprehensiveness or insight.

In section two (chapters 4-10, 80 pages) Powlison attempts to define and help us understand anger.  He asserts that anger is essentially being “against that”.  “The underlying essence is the negative evaluation: active displeasure toward something that is important enough to care about.”  arising from the fact that we are moral beings as we attempt to discern, judge, and forcefully act in a corrective manner on what we believe is right, fair, good, and just in personal, social, or divine affairs.  It is “’the moral emotion’ because it makes a statement (based on a judgment) about what matters.” that “something we think important is not the way it’s supposed to be”.  He also questions whether anyone would want to live in a world lacking the correctives of solidly based, well-informed, objectively real and realistic moral judgments.  When these judgments are wise, good, and solidly based in reality, they can be powerful correctives in human affairs.  But our pervasive problem is the faultiness, subjectivity, and imperfection of our judgements and in our clear understanding of the unchanging moral code which has been both divinely implanted in us and seconded, reinforced by genuine divine revelation (accept no substitutes for that).

Chapter five shows that our souls (the indirectly observed essence of our will, desires, character, personality, thought-life, etc.) impact our bodies (human physiology as that being more available to scientific analysis) since we are inseparably (until death) integrated beings, body and soul united and affecting each other, with soul the primary actor.  Anger, a soulish quality, manifests itself physiologically, whether expressed, repressed, or some combination of those.  It is a passionate, high energy state of being that reacts to actual or perceived wrongs toward self, others, creation, or even cosmologically / existentially.  It is judicial (but generally taking place in an unfair, vigilante, kangaroo court in our minds), with plaintiffs, defendants, judge and jury, and execution of sentence, the aggrieved party (me) playing all parts but the defendant.  It is also military and god-like in requiring its desires to be enforced.  He lists a few penetrating questions regarding desires, motives, and intentions on page 54.  Want / must have my way because I’m the victim, I am God.  But “When God’s larger purposes are in control, the poisonous evil of anger is neutralized. Anger becomes the servant of goodness … becomes just, and … merciful to all who will turn and trust and be conformed to his image.”

Chapter 6 Powlison assets that anger is both inherently natural but also learned from role models as reinforced by habits.  Anger is “the fighting … justice … the deliver the oppressed from evil emotion (since) … All of us come wired with a sense of justice” something which can be executed well or poorly.  “To respond constructively to trouble is a fine art, gained through long practice.”

The next two chapters, “Constructive Displeasure of Mercy” helpfully explicate “How can displeasure at wrong become an expression of faith in God, and then an expression of love for people?” following Jesus’ many examples and teachings in the canon of Scripture received from His hand.  In His deliberate mercy toward us and in wisdom and love He justifies ungodly persons (all of those divinely chosen in eternity), transforming and redeeming His perfect displeasure and just condemnation of us into a thing of beauty and truth, effecting “love to the loveless shown that they might lovely be”.  Mercy is “how we love in the face of something wrong” acting wisely, skillfully, and constructively as the situation demands.  The key aspects of this mercy are patience, forgiveness, charity, and constructive conflict as lived and seen in the earthly life of the eternal Logos, the Word made flesh, Jesus of Nazareth, the Christ, the Son of God.  Patience is acutely aware of wrong, but is long-suffering, forbearing, wise in reaction, and slow to anger in the face of evil / wrong vs. the quick and easy out we are always tempted to take.  Forgiveness, the willingness to not get even, is of two parts; a thoroughgoing attitude before God that refuses to hold anything against anyone (Mk 11:25) and secondly a transactional forgiveness which confronts, as wisdom dictates according to the person / situation, the wrong with skill, understanding, and love. It consciously acts unfairly in mercy toward wrong, even as God “does not deal with us according to our sins, nor repay us according to our iniquities” Ps 103:10. “To fear God is to wake up (and know clearly and well) who he is, to know my (utter) dependency on him, to realize that his opinion of me is the (only) opinion that (really, finally) matters, to (know and) feel my vulnerability before him.  He is (perfectly) good …  I am not.”

Next is charity.  In contrast to our powerful, pervasive tendencies toward vindictiveness and revenge, charity generously does good toward and to someone who acts in an objectively evil manner, while refusing to discount its fundamental evilness in light of eternal standards of right.  “You have heard it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven … You must therefore be perfect as you heavenly Father is perfect” Jesus of Nazareth as quoted in Mt 5:43-44, 48.   God requires this perfection of being of all but especially of His redeemed children, something in process in us but to be fully, certainly realized for all so redeemed!  In stark contrast to retaliatory motives, thoughts, or actions, we are required to “Repay no one evil for evil, but give thought to do what is honorable in the sight of all … live peaceably with all … never avenge yourselves … (since) Vengeance is mine (alone), I will repay, says the Lord … if your enemy is hungry feed him … Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good” Rom 12:17-21.  What a demanding calling – wow and ow!  A good, but (of course) imperfect, example of such a man was Abraham Lincoln, perhaps the most generous, fair, magnanimous, and forgiving President this nation has ever had, and partially, perhaps largely, why he is held in such high esteem by those who know their history.  Those qualities, accurately documented by Doris K. Goodwin’s book “Team of Rivals”, reflected in that man the things that Jesus taught us by His life, teaching, and self-sacrifice on our behalf, of the hard realism of charity.

Finally, there is constructive conflict.  “Patience makes you hang in there through the process.  Forgiveness makes you let go of getting even or even holding on to bitterness.  Charity makes you generous (to the undeserving … these qualities) make you the right kind of tough, able to do (this final) fourth mercy as needed.  This displeasure of mercy enters forcefully into conflict in order to redeem… (it) is not a free pass … (but) an invitation to turn and repent.” revealing the God Who is Who “will show mercy on whom I will show mercy … slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness … (and) who will by no means clear the guilty.”  Ex 33:19, 34:6-7.  His mercy is not niceness, but rather infinitely costly to Him, done on our behalf to His glory alone.

CONCLUSION:

Overall this was an excellent, helpful, deeply insightful, penetrating, biblically faithful approach to a problem that has affected us humans ubiquitously, pervasively throughout our history.  Excellent and outstanding – 4.9 stars.  Well worth your investment of time, thought, money, reflection, and sanctifying change.

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Pastor Paul – From his pen http://pilgrimsontheway.com/3288/pastor-paul/ http://pilgrimsontheway.com/3288/pastor-paul/#respond Wed, 17 Feb 2016 23:06:30 +0000 http://pilgrimsontheway.com/?p=3288 Pastor Paul “From the Pen of Pastor Paul” is a medium-sized, well-produced, non-technical paperback commentary by EP Books (an increasingly valuable publisher in England) of ~ 330 pages divided into 32 chapters of two major sections corresponding to the Apostle Paul’s two letters to the church in Thessalonica, a result […]

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Hyde Pastor PaulPastor Paul

“From the Pen of Pastor Paul” is a medium-sized, well-produced, non-technical paperback commentary by EP Books (an increasingly valuable publisher in England) of ~ 330 pages divided into 32 chapters of two major sections corresponding to the Apostle Paul’s two letters to the church in Thessalonica, a result of 10 months of sermons on those letters. The author is Rev. Danny Hyde, a URCNA pastor in Southern California, who has developed a growing reputation for excellence in writing as a biblically, theologically, historically well-informed, astute pastor and thinker.

Interaction:
Appropriately taking his lead from the biblical text, Hyde addresses a multiplicity of topics that arise naturally, authentically from that canonically authoritative text (exegesis), a biblical exegesis that is firmly based on the essential Christian principle of ‘sola Scriptura’ (Scripture alone as the final, ultimate authority for Christian faith and practice along with the other four ‘solas’ flowing from the world-shaking 16th century Reformation of the Christian faith). Some of the topics covered are:

– The urgent need to be growing in that apostolic faith in steadfast, healthy, solid manner.

– The essential need of continuing in morning and evening prayers to God, as basic and vital to the Christian life as breathing is to the body.

– The importance of Christian preaching, a true preaching in Christian worship that clearly presents the law (what God demands of us as sinful persons but beyond our sin-impaired capabilities) and the Gospel (how Christ has perfectly, permanently fulfilled those demands on behalf of His elect) via the divine imputation of a righteousness that has been gifted to us via the Spirit’s implantation of faith in us through His mysterious converting / regenerating acts in His sovereign, gracious timing and choosing via the means of that preached Word. For every one so converted, God has given us a personal gift (faith) that is now our permanent possession, something He requires of us that we guard, nourish, and otherwise care for each day of our lives, by both our own actions and as wisely, carefully guarded and nurtured by those divinely set in authority over us (pastors and elders).

– The effects of such preaching during worship on both the unconverted (evangelism) and converted (in its primary purpose, edification / sanctification of the converted), a growth in the faith that optimally produces godly thinking and character in all believers.

– The tenses of the Christian life: past (conversion to God), present (genuine, solid growth in grace(s) and truth), and future (the authentic hope of anticipating of Christ’s return in judgment and reward as he, in divine perfection, sets all things right beyond our wildest imaginings).

– There’s much, much more in this book, but for that you’ll need to purchase it and read it carefully, thoughtfully, prayerfully, and with those letters open before you.

Conclusion:
These letters of Paul reveal, in a unique manner among his other writings, a deep insight into the life and thinking of a godly, seasoned pastor uniquely gifted as an Apostle, and carefully trained, formed, and led by the Holy Spirit. As such these letters are important and necessary to all Christians for our growth in grace, truth, love, and fruitfulness of our lives. Rev. Hyde’s book is a very helpful guide to these letters. It is a deep, solid, yet readily accessible commentary on those canonical letters. It is always a delight to read an accessible commentary by an author whom you know has the skills, apparent piety / character, depth and breadth of knowledge, and other necessary attributes to open up the text in greater fullness.

Positives: Clear, insightful writing. Also Hyde’s interesting approach of using commentaries in selecting the best from distinct periods of church history – in this case Chrysostom (Patristic), Aquinas (Medieval), Calvin (Reformation), James Ferguson (Puritan), F.F. Bruce and Stott (Modern).

Negatives: End notes :-(

QUOTES / RESOURCES:
“Our people must become practically what they are theologically. “ p. 22

See Danny Hyde’s other books on Amazon, Westminster Seminary, Monergism, etc.

A copy of this book was provided to me gratis by EP Press and Cross-Focused Reviews for an honest review – thanks!

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A Lost God in a Lost World http://pilgrimsontheway.com/3264/a-lost-god/ http://pilgrimsontheway.com/3264/a-lost-god/#respond Mon, 23 Nov 2015 04:14:49 +0000 http://pilgrimsontheway.com/?p=3264 OVERVIEW:In nine well written, easily read chapters (~ 150 pages total), Tinker, an Anglican vicar (pastor) in northeast England, uses the theme “When God…”, to address central gospel truths of God in relationship to fallen (unbelieving, prideful, rebellious, idolatrous, etc.) man, as taught in Holy Scripture. He somewhat follows a […]

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A Lost God in a Lost WorldOVERVIEW:
In nine well written, easily read chapters (~ 150 pages total), Tinker, an Anglican vicar (pastor) in northeast England, uses the theme “When God…”, to address central gospel truths of God in relationship to fallen (unbelieving, prideful, rebellious, idolatrous, etc.) man, as taught in Holy Scripture. He somewhat follows a progressive historical redemptive order in addressing “the lostness of man, the greatness (and goodness) of God, and the glory of the future” to correct our distorted, basically idolatrous thinking and desires that arise from the core of our pervasively, but not wholly, corrupt (body, soul, desire, intellect, will, etc.), our substantially less than optimal natures.

 

A LOST GOD? – REFLECTION:
David Wells, in the foreword, tells of recent trends in the formerly Christian northern hemisphere toward growing marginalization and / or deeply rooted antagonism toward Christ and His church, a rejection of God and His supreme authority in the individual and corporate affairs of human thought, attitudes, and behaviors. Western Europe and the USA increasingly claim to be ‘spiritual’ but not religious, which is often just a diffuse, feel-good, self-aggrandizing, rather meaningless term, while the Christian faith is shifting to the southern parts of the globe.

Chapter 1 “When God is Weightless” is about pervasive human idolatry, taught via an exposition of Isaiah 44.  I thought this was an odd place to start, as gospel teaching usually starts with the fundamental facts of the eternally self-existent, absolutely free, independent God as He has revealed Himself historically in word and action, His nature and being, the goodness of His creation done by divine fiat, the unfathomable mystery of allowing imperfection / evil to come into creation via the rebellion of the first couple, not to mention the prior ethical departure of Satan.  Idols are various God substitutes (counterfeit gods, supreme allegiances, false religions or belief systems), some of which can be good in their proper place, but which often command inappropriate religious devotion. These are such things such as knowledge / science / philosophy / reason / religion, power / influence, wealth, family, church, nature, people, pets, self-aggrandizement, sex, mysticism, sports, etc. – anything but the genuine, reverent worship and knowledge of and trust in the creating, sustaining, redeeming, judging, self-existent God that is.

This pervasive tendency also impacts Christians, a ‘natural’ tendency of our less than optimal, current human condition. The central question, revealed by how we actually live, is ‘What god do you really believe in?’  I think a good follow up question is “How closely does that agree with things as they actually are in my life?”.  Rather than worship the God Who is, we often would rather pretend that there is no ultimate, final accountability, no divine Judge to pronounce, with precision and perfection, the final guilt or innocence of all who have ever lived, in calling each of us to account for what we have done with His historic, ubiquitously fate-determining self-revelation in Jesus of Nazareth as faithfully taught, recorded, explicated, and preserved in holy Scripture. “Enlightenment rationalists made a god out of reason; Romantics deified the imagination, Nationalists exalted the nation; and Marxists offered an economic analysis of sin and salvation. ‘Not believing in God is a far more arduous affair that in generally imagined … When (the God Who actually is) is rejected something else must be concocted to replace him’…”

Chapter 2, “When God is Replaced” helped clarify for me an important passage about Adam and the resultant fall (corruption) of humanity in him, as correctly taught in early American elementary school primers, that ‘in Adam’s fall sinned (and died) we all’.  Adam was constituted and lived as a public person (he and Jesus of Nazareth, the Christ being the only two such persons in human history), the unique representative of humanity as its sole federal head.  The account in Ezekiel about human pride and its resultant devastating impact helped put into its proper place an important piece of the puzzle for me, one often poorly interpreted in modern evangelicalism.  The historic king of Tyre epitomizes the core corruption of paganism, i.e., the unregenerate human condition, giving insight into the condition of Adam both before and after his devastating sin and this king typifies Adam, not Satan as is commonly taught. For me, this was a very significant insight, revealing the pride and resultant corruption of human nature that took place within Adam’s being via that initial sin, a false, corrupting pride of delusional, rebellious self-autonomy, something that affects and impacts every one of us, his (and her) descendants.

Chapter three discusses the pressing human need for a genuine knowledge and worship of the self-revealing God Who is, ultimately self-revealing in Christ alone historically and by means of Word and Spirit.  Chapter 4 expounds on the necessity and centrality of the cross of Christ, of the purpose of God becoming man in His humiliation via the incarnation and then in the exaltation / vindication in His resurrection and ascension to ultimate, universal power. In the next chapter, Tinker talks about the application of truth to humans by the Holy Spirit, in conversion and sanctification or judgment.

Chapter 6 speaks of the faithful preaching of the gospel as the normal means by which the Spirit of God brings about the conversion of sinners via revelation of God in His holiness, of our spiritually desperate condition, and of the gifted nature of genuine faith. The next chapter addresses how God effects salvation by irresistibly drawing those He has loved from eternity to Himself. Chapter 8 speaks of how things infallibly will culminate as God progressively brings all things to their final, glorious conclusion. Christians have a solid, genuine hope in God and what He alone can and will achieve, while having much less confidence in our individual or group capabilities to bring about utopia (such efforts usually result in even greater dystopia), even though we should strive to mitigate the impacts of sin in the whole scope of human affairs. The final chapter is on the utopia that only God can and will bring about, a state of true freedom from anything contrary to God and His being (sin, pain, death, distress, etc.). For such, we can only patiently wait and pray.

CONCLUSION:
Overall this was a useful, helpful read, one grounded in biblical realities / truths taught winsomely and clearly. There were a number of helpful thoughts and insights into the nature of the human condition and of God and His self-revelation in Christ, Word, and Spirit as He graciously and mercifully condescends to relate to us and the rest of His creation. Soundly recommended, 4.5 stars. This book was provided gratis by the publisher and Cross-Focused Reviews in exchange for an unbiased review.

A Lost God in a Lost World, Melvin Tinker

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A Well Ordered Church http://pilgrimsontheway.com/3197/a-well-ordered-church/ http://pilgrimsontheway.com/3197/a-well-ordered-church/#respond Sat, 01 Aug 2015 22:44:45 +0000 http://pilgrimsontheway.com/?p=3197 INTRO: This is a medium-sized, well-produced paperback by EP Books of almost 200 pages, divided into 4 sections (Identity, Authority, Ecumenicity, Activity) containing 11 chapters.  It approaches the important topic of the church being divinely ordered, empowered, and vibrantly healthy from a Reformed (biblical, apostolic, catholic Protestant) perspective and uses […]

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A Well Ordered ChurchINTRO:

This is a medium-sized, well-produced paperback by EP Books of almost 200 pages, divided into 4 sections (Identity, Authority, Ecumenicity, Activity) containing 11 chapters.  It approaches the important topic of the church being divinely ordered, empowered, and vibrantly healthy from a Reformed (biblical, apostolic, catholic Protestant) perspective and uses historic, Reformed confessional standards as a guide to understanding what Scripture teaches about the church.

THE MEAT:

Identity – In this section, the authors ask the question “What is the church really?”  Two heretical extremes mentioned are churchless ‘Christianity’ (“I don’t need church or to come under pastoral care and be a contributing member of a distinct community of fellow Christians”) or a Christ-less churchianity (where the ‘church’ is  little more than a social, political, etc. club having weak or lifeless rituals of various sorts).  But true Christians (regenerated and converted to God) belong 100% to Christ, the reigning Head in heaven of His church militant on earth and triumphant in heaven, as people who are being gradually conformed into His image.  We are those bought with His blood alone, called to serve in humble, biblically faithful obedience at His pleasure and command, not ours.   Our unity is primarily found vertically but is also to be manifest horizontally (to the degree that finite, fallible, sinful but regenerated people are able).

Authority – Here the authors detail how the church is to be structured, directed, and function via biblical principles vs. personal preferences in avoiding two extremes of unexamined tradition or pure democracy.  In Scripture, we see that God has ordained authority in every area of life, in families, government, work, and the church.  In the church, elders are commissioned to rule as faithful, gentle, wise, mature stewards of the faith and of Christ’s people.  Deacons likewise are to have a ministry of practical mercy to the church and then community.  Such leaders are to be chosen by the congregation and ordained by prayer and laying on of hands.

Ecumenicity – The question in this section is how to relate to sister churches, local or other churches, federations, etc.  Here the authors discuss the need for unity to the extent possible between churches and federations or denominations of churches.  Extreme positions are the isolation of independence or gross theological promiscuity, neither of which promotes the gospel of Christ, the genuine reconciliation of sinners to God through Christ.  To what extent and how can we show unity in the mission of gospel preaching and reconciliation? In identifying true, healthy churches, the authors recount the classic three marks of a true church which are biblically faithful:  preaching of the gospel, administration of the sacraments, and church discipline.

Activity – The last section addresses the church’s divine mandate / mission:  how do we use resources and what is our proper focus (what are we really about?).  Our primarily activity consists of the assembled worship of those eternally elect in Christ and is to be God-centered, fully dialogical, participatory, and corporate, regulated by the Bible, filled with the Word, believing, penitent, sincere, humble, joyous, and thankful.  Our assemblies are to be well-ordered and broad, and as humanly (not theologically) inclusive as possible: socially, racially, culturally, age-wise, etc. as we meet with God in reverence, awe, and adoration, focused on God & our need for the gospel, carefully including all the biblical elements of worship in carefully structured order as God in Christ by the Spirit addresses us:  called to worship, greeting, reading of law and gospel, confession and pardon, a gospel sermon (guilt, grace, and gratitude), and benediction.  We appropriately respond in invocation, spoken and sung prayers, historic confessions of belief, singing of prayer / praise-doxologies / confession, offerings.  The authors also have some ideas on how to be biblically faithful in the attractional and incarnational church models.  Finally they discuss the critical need for ongoing repentance and church discipline as a critical aspect of a vibrant church.

CONCLUSION:

This is a short, theologically solid, helpful guide to the basics of having a vibrant, solid, gospel oriented, God-centered and honoring church.  I recommend it, particularly for those who would like to see how the church is to be biblically oriented and led.   4.6 stars (end notes L).  I received this book gratis from EP Books via Cross-Focused Reviews in exchange for a fair, honest evaluation.

RESOURCES:

“He who does not have the church for a mother has not God for a Father.” –  John Calvin.  Calvin’s meaning is that Christ, via Spirit and Word, normally gives birth to and nurtures his precious, chosen ones by the divinely ordinary means of grace in weekly Lord’s Day assemblies of well-ordered Word and sacrament ministry.

By His Spirit and Word: How Christ Builds His Church, Cornelis Venema

How Jesus Runs the Church, Guy Waters

Called to Serve, Michael Brown, ed.

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Marie Durand http://pilgrimsontheway.com/3170/marie-durand/ http://pilgrimsontheway.com/3170/marie-durand/#respond Wed, 15 Jul 2015 00:32:55 +0000 http://pilgrimsontheway.com/?p=3170 OVERVIEW:This is the 9th in Simonetta Carr’s exceptionally well researched / written, excellently produced non-fiction series, “Christian Biographies for Young Children”. Like the other volumes in this series, it is a large format ~ (10”W x 8“H) quality hardback of ~ 60 pages with helpful photos, artwork, and of course […]

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Marie Durand, Simonetta Carr

OVERVIEW:
This is the 9th in Simonetta Carr’s exceptionally well researched / written, excellently produced non-fiction series, “Christian Biographies for Young Children”. Like the other volumes in this series, it is a large format ~ (10”W x 8“H) quality hardback of ~ 60 pages with helpful photos, artwork, and of course her usual carefully researched, factually accurate, easily readable text. Reading / comprehension level is ~ 3rd grade and up, but all books in the series are also suitable for adults seeking a quick overview of the historical characters highlighted, some of the milieu in which they lived and significance of their lives and times, and other interesting, relevant, and helpful facts.

The setting of Marie’s life (1711 – 1776) is southeastern France, which then was strongly Roman Catholic.  For ~ 90 years prior to 1685 France had experienced a decreasing level of toleration for Protestants. With Louis XIV’s ascension to the throne in 1685 that limited toleration came to an end as he re-instituted harsh persecutions of Protestants, burning hundreds of churches, exiling all non-conforming pastors, and imprisoning or enslaving other lay Protestants.

Marie Durand ‘s Protestant parents surreptitiously taught their children the Bible and Protestant catechisms / theology, the family also secretly worshiping with other believers in caves and other low profile venues. In 1728, a new king Louis XV stepped up persecutions and ordered the execution of all Protestant preachers. Around this time Marie’s brother Pierre had become a trained, ordained (1726), fugitive Protestant preacher who was later (in 1732) captured by French soldiers and executed.

After soldiers discovered a Bible and other Protestant materials in their house, Marie’s father was sent to an island prison off the coast of Southern France (1728) along with her new husband. At the age of 19 she was arrested and imprisoned as a conscientious, resistant (non-Catholic) objector, remaining incarcerated for 38 years (until 1768) in a prison tower in a swamp on the coast of southern France, refusing, with most other women there, to obtain her freedom by recanting Christ and her Christian faith. Other women, some with their children or infants, were also imprisoned with Marie for their faith as they endured life in that dark, primitive one-room prison exposed to heat, cold, rain, mosquitoes, and dampness, having only basic food, sleeping and toilet arrangements, etc. Marie apparently remained faithful to Christ, helping her fellow prisoners and others until death, being freed from prison to live in poverty for her last 8 years, afterward to be welcomed and richly received by her faithful Lord and savior into His presence in heaven.

Following her death and after a brief period of religious freedom, rationalist, ‘utopian’, ‘progressive’ philosophers of the ‘Enlightenment’ helped incite revolutionaries to imprison and murder as many Jews, Catholics, and Protestants as possible, believing that all such were retarding the advancement of French society. That persecution became known as the Reign of Terror, demonic strains of which remain with us today waiting once again to be stirred up and inflamed and which once again seem to be raising its ugly, murderous head in various parts of the world and in the US.

REFLECTION:
The somewhat untested Christian church in America (excluding of course all pretenders, rationalistic and / or relativistic theological liberals, mystics, or others) has yet to experience such harsh, wide-spread persecution as have / do our genuine brothers and sisters in various times and places (see northeast Nigeria and Boko Harum, etc.). In the U.S., such intolerant hatred for Christ and His church has mainly been held in check due to the wisdom providentially granted our founders in the founding documents of our country as reflected in individually, personally guaranteed freedoms of religion, speech, and association, the right to keep and bear arms, etc.

Those enumerated rights and constitutional structures have helped suppress, to a relatively remarkable degree considering history, rabid anti-Christian (or anti-Jewish, etc.) intolerance and bigotry. Persecutions as such have typically manifest in lesser forms such as childish mockery, pseudo-intellectual disdain of rationalists / self-styled ‘progressives’ / pseudo-relativists, various attempts at marginalization, economic deprivations, etc.  But virulently intolerant strains are always waiting in the wings as groups cunningly plot and strategize methods to attack the church and / or individual believers in attempts to shut down every voice of dissent or prophetic warning to those who are perishing. Such incipient or actual persecutors exist in both totalitarian camps of the right (fascist types) and the left (communist types, etc.) as seen in militant extremists of ISIS, KKK, LGBT, feminist / abortionist, racist, etc. ideologies, all seeking to bring harm Christ and His church and to broader society. The most virulently intolerant, high profile attacks currently flow from freedom-hating ideologues on the left which, at present, overshadow equally virulent but locally (in the U.S.)  less potent ideologies stemming from Islamic fascists and others on the right. But both forms of extremism pose significant, potentially lethal threats to civilization.

We will likely experience ever more hateful, slanderous, dishonest attacks aimed at undermining First Amendment freedoms / rights for Christians first and later others via legal, economic, propaganda, intimidation, and even criminal mob /  terrorist / individual action in the future. Those things are always lurking just under the surface, reflecting the ubiquitous reality of original and actual sin in our ubiquitously sin impacted lives and world and as something both to be inevitably expected and certainly prayed about.

In a wider, longer-term, and more comforting perspective, Jesus continues to reign over all affairs of His church (and indeed all creation) in sovereign, glorious majesty in heaven, guiding His people and all other affairs to their final, infallible conclusion of His Judgment resulting in unending banishment of all callous, rebellious, unbelieving evildoers and purely gracious everlasting, reward-filled redemption for His church.  As Lord of creation, He often allows painful, unpleasant events to purge and purify His people as He infallibly advances the inexorable course of redemptive history toward its final culmination, to be realized at His awesome, awe-full return in unassailable power and glory as Redeemer of His people and Judge of all the earth, all at the time of His choosing.

CONCLUSION:
This account of Marie’s life was very engrossing; I read almost all of it one sitting. Your kids (and yourselves) will be intellectually and spiritually well served by this highly recommended book and series. 4.9 of 5 stars and timely for the church. I received this book gratis from the publisher via Cross-Focused Reviews in exchange for a fair, honest review.

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History, Law, and Christianity http://pilgrimsontheway.com/2939/history-law-and-christianity/ http://pilgrimsontheway.com/2939/history-law-and-christianity/#respond Mon, 18 May 2015 11:44:27 +0000 http://pilgrimsontheway.com/?p=2939 BRIEF OVERVIEW:This short paperback (~ 100 pages) of two sections (historical and legal analysis) was originally written ~ 50 years ago (since updated) and has two appendices. The author, Dr. John Montgomery, wrote this condensed apologetic to hit certain highlights of argumentation about the value of the New Testament documents […]

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History, Law, and Christianity - MontgomeryBRIEF OVERVIEW:
This short paperback (~ 100 pages) of two sections (historical and legal analysis) was originally written ~ 50 years ago (since updated) and has two appendices. The author, Dr. John Montgomery, wrote this condensed apologetic to hit certain highlights of argumentation about the value of the New Testament documents in painting an accurate, trustworthy, reliable picture of Jesus of Nazareth, what He did, and Who He actually was (and is) as presented by Himself according to the testimony of immediate followers in the primary, well-attested documents (the canon of Scripture) historically received by the whole church and to which we have ready access. In the legal section, the main standard used by the author is that used in modern trial law of proving a case beyond any “reasonable doubt”.

The author, John W. Montgomery is a lawyer with 11 advanced degrees and has practiced law in three nations. He attempts to provide a brief overview of the methods used to judge the reliability of ancient documents using normal, applicable standards of history. In the legal analysis section, he uses evidentiary standards as applied to any other type of evidence. In presenting a solid, factual basis of the reliability of Scripture, his ultimate goal is to point the reader intellectually / volitionally to the One to whom those documents point with powerful, penetrating, reliable witness.

INTERACTION & REFLECTION:
In the historical evidence section, Dr. Montgomery uses three standard tests of historical authenticity / reliability of the New Testament accounts: the quality of textual tradition: 1) Bibliographical – the rich, unsurpassed multiplicity of venerable manuscripts available, 2) Internal evidence – the benefit of the doubt goes to the document itself, not to presuppositions of fraud or error but rather honestly testing such based on internal evidence (contradictions, factual errors, etc.). Also, NT writers repeatedly claim eyewitness status and / or direct access to such. 3) External evidence – archaeological, geographical, historical accounts, early writers (Papias, Irenaeus, etc.). Finally, if Jesus was not divine as He repeatedly and pointedly claimed then He was: 1) a con artist, 2) insane, or 3) the NT authors (His immediate disciples) were one or both of those things and / or wild-eyed exaggerators. All those options however are contrary to logic and any genuine evidence we have.

In the legal section, Montgomery uses the evidential standards of common law by keeping unhelpful, unnecessary presuppositions to a minimum while applying probability analysis (as with any judicial case, based primarily on the actual facts of the case and the implications of those) and the ‘burden of proof’ principle (what fact-driven arguments can a person, with intellectual integrity, bring to bear on the discussion). He also helpfully delineates legal methodology used to determine fact from fiction and the complexities of deception. He finally insists, as every good trial lawyer must, on an unequivocal, intellectually honest acceptance and genuine welcoming of the verdict regarding Christ based on the foregoing data, logic, reasoning, and analysis as being both inescapably reasonable, rational, and, most importantly, as divinely commanded.

Stimulated by a speech by a skeptical philosopher, Avrum Stroll, Montgomery attempts to show certain glaring deficiencies and intellectual dishonesty of Stroll’s approach (similar to B. Ehrman) in: disregarding important facts, cherry picking ‘authorities’, discounting primary documents, using faulty circular or a priori reasoning, and adopting wildly off-key depictions of the religious milieu of Jesus’ time.

The clarity in setting out this evidentiary, fact based, philosophically sound approach was helpful in clarifying for me the historically reliable basis of the Christian faith and the One it depicts. The implications of such for each person’s destiny are profound and inescapable – intellectual dodging at some point will be clearly seen by all for the damning, heart-driven folly it really is.

CONCLUSION:
Although not an apologist, I found this book to be helpful, well written, logically sound, insightful concerning historical and legal methodology, and fact based. It attempts to evaluate, fairly and honestly, the extant evidence we have by the highest standards of jurisprudence and historical methodology.  Due to a seemingly intractable, deep-seated bias, some attempt to downplay the factual evidence and its obvious implications and / or bring to bear a priori presuppositions about the existence of God, miracles, etc. ruling such out before fairly evaluating the evidence rather than objectively address the facts of the case as they stand. In contrast, the author produces “a case of staggering consequence for the serious (honest) inquirer.”

This book should be very useful and is recommended (4.5 stars) for genuine seekers of truth, those whom God may be preparing for and calling into His salvation. It is also useful for believers to help see the solid historical / factual basis for the Christian faith, something of vital importance for all of us. This book was provided gratis by EP Books via Cross-Focused Reviews in exchange for an honest, careful review.

 

EXCERPTS &/OR RESOURCES:

See “The New Testament Documents:  Are They Reliable”   by F. F. Bruce

“… if the only possible foundation for human rights is transcendental and revelational …, it is imperative to demonstrate evidentially that God did indeed reveal himself in the human sphere.” p. xiv

“Here, we present the primary, relevant, ‘admissible’ facts concerning the most influential single individual in the history of mankind. It is the up to the reader to give a personal answer to the question he posed to his contemporaries: ‘Who do you say that I am?’ ”. p. xv

“The earliest records we have of the life and ministry of Jesus give the overwhelming impression that this man went around not so much ‘doing good’ as making a decided nuisance of himself…. When Jesus asked, ‘Who am I?’ he was evidently fully aware of his own (divine / human nature and unique mission). What he sought to achieve by his questions was a similar awareness of his nature by others.” p. 3

“What, then, does a historian know about Jesus Christ? … first and foremost, that the New Testament documents can be relied upon to give an accurate portrait of him, and that this portrait cannot be rationalized away by wishful thinking, philosophical presuppositionalism, or literary maneuvering (among other things).” P. 20

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Ulrich Zwingli http://pilgrimsontheway.com/2912/ulrich-zwingli/ http://pilgrimsontheway.com/2912/ulrich-zwingli/#respond Fri, 08 May 2015 20:20:28 +0000 http://pilgrimsontheway.com/?p=2912 BRIEF OVERVIEW:This smallish format paperback, one in the series of ‘Bitesize Biographies’, in ~ 160 pages, 12 chapters, and one appendix presents a factually laden account of one of the early Swiss reformers, a Roman priest who became an influential, biblically reformed pastor, political leader, and military chaplain. The author […]

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Ulrich ZwingliBRIEF OVERVIEW:
This smallish format paperback, one in the series of ‘Bitesize Biographies’, in ~ 160 pages, 12 chapters, and one appendix presents a factually laden account of one of the early Swiss reformers, a Roman priest who became an influential, biblically reformed pastor, political leader, and military chaplain. The author is a pastor of a Pennsylvania URCNA church and has written several high quality children’s books about notable Reformed people and confessions, among others.

His aim is to provide a brief, factual, readable introduction to Zwingli and the significance of events surrounding his life, practices, theology, and influence, those things occurring during a tumultuous time of seemingly long overdue theological and ecclesiastical reform of the Christian faith in bringing it closer to its biblical, apostolic, gospel roots. This book is intended for those interested in the Reformation, its major players, and its historical, theological, political, cultural, and economic contexts, especially as those took place in Switzerland in the early 16th century.

INTERACTION & REFLECTION:
“Ulrich Zwingli” yielded helpful insight into a world very different in many ways from our own in 21st century America, being removed in both time, advances in knowledge, and distance. They perhaps: were more grounded in immediate natural reality vs. man-made / electronic, less scientifically advanced / physically comfortable, had less access to media, were feeling their way back to sound apostolic theology and practices, saw slow but decisive and profoundly revolutionary reformation of Rome’s practices and teachings, had deep entanglements of church and state, were hungry for spiritual truth, etc., while, like all people of all ages, being wholly populated initially from conception with those fundamentally in the same dead, unresponsive spiritual condition as we all were outside the grace / church of God.

The book tells of Zwingli’s relationships with such people as Erasmus, Bullinger, and Luther, his classic education and study of classics, and his eventual ministry in Zurich where he began to preach through Scripture, eventually coming into major, deadly conflict with Rome. Some of his followers became radical Anabaptist, iconoclastic opponents on the left. Other opponents were Rome on the right, and even sadly, strangely by a rather harsh, intransigent Luther.

Some useful things I learned were that Zwingli’s first real conflict came during the Lenten season in 1522 in which Zwingli resisted Rome’s imposition of dietary restrictions citing Christian freedom in those things not explicitly or implicitly proscribed in Scripture. This was essentially a matter of ultimate authority where he began to reject the unbiblical binding of the conscience with purely man-made rules that flowed from Rome’s deadening accretions to the faith added over the centuries. Things snowballed from there, including further divisions over required celibacy of church leaders and most fundamentally the authority, power, sufficiency, and clarity of Scripture. Zwingli may have gone too far at first in denying the need for reading Scripture within the context of the historic church, but he generally remained a moderating, mediating influence compared to many of his followers, perhaps somewhat like Luther in that respect.

In a first disputation (1523) the Zurich city council defended Zwingli against Rome and upped the educational requirements for clergy and lay, rejected the invocation of saints, images, the standard mass and took a more biblical approach on the Supper, baptism, papal authority, etc. A second disputation called by Zurich involved ~ 900 participants, a meeting theologically dominated by the Zwingli camp. 1524 saw increasing turmoil between Zurich and the rest of Switzerland including executions, etc. of those now deviating from Rome. Many other events, meeting, activities, etc. took place for the next seven years until his death. He died in a battle with Swiss Catholics, along with many relatives, but by then the power of the pure and simple gospel had taken hold in that country and in much of Western Europe.

The life of Zwingli depicts the power of the Spirit and Word which combined n gospel preaching and practices to overthrow the human power of an established church which, via man-made accretions and perversions of theology and practices, etc., had grown increasingly at odds with the gospel of Christ found in Scripture (the 66 books of the Protestant canon).

CONCLUSION:
I found this book to be well written, factual, based on solid research, insightful in interpretation, and quite helpful in bringing to life the contextual situations, events, and facts of the life of this important Reformer. This book should be useful to those interested in this significant man, that historical period, the theology of the early Reformation, the history of Switzerland, etc.   I recommend it for those readers (4.7 stars). It was provided gratis by EP Books via Cross-Focused Reviews in exchange for an honest, balanced review.

 

RESOURCES:

Click here for an interview with the author

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Library: May 2015 http://pilgrimsontheway.com/2831/library-may-2015/ http://pilgrimsontheway.com/2831/library-may-2015/#respond Fri, 01 May 2015 15:01:33 +0000 http://pilgrimsontheway.com/?p=2831 “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and mind and soul and strength”  We are off to an excellent start with 18 registered members (individuals or families) and 10 (~ 25%) of original items loaned out to them. Thanks to several generous donations (and some yet to […]

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Coram Deo Logo

“You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and mind and soul and strength”

 We are off to an excellent start with 18 registered members (individuals or families) and 10 (~ 25%) of original items loaned out to them.

Thanks to several generous donations (and some yet to come), we are already approaching 100 volumes (most additions to be ready for lending this week).

 

Library Overview & Lending Info

 

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 New Media (click to see all):

 

Many children’s books added – Bible, Biographies, etc.:  by Sinclair Ferguson, William Boekestein, Simonetta Carr, etc.

Also: apologetics, preaching, conflict resolution, catechism, and so on…

  

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 Tolle Lege:  ‘Take up and Read’

 

Living in God's Two Kingdoms  Living in God’s Two Kingdoms, by David VanDrunen.  Do you sometimes wonder how we are to think about and live our lives, in a truly biblical manner, as dual citizens of both this present life and, with the eyes of faith firmly set on the future, of the world to come as those gifted with a unique and almost unbelievable destiny?  Thanks to a generous donation, we have received four copies of this profoundly insightful, solidly grounded, very valuable book, written at an accessible (i.e., easily readable) adult level.  VanDrunen is  a trained lawyer and currently professor of systematic theology and Christian ethics at Westminster Seminary California.  Get a copy, read, and grow in your understanding of God’s revelation of Himself today!

 

 

Lady Jane Grey

Lady Jane Grey, by Simonetta Carr.  Another in this series (10 currently) of Simonetta Carr’s well written, illustrated, and produced series of biographies for ages ~7 – adult.  Living only until her execution at age 17 and ruling England for less than two weeks, Lady Jane Grey is still remembered for her intelligence and steadfast defense of the gospel. Declared by the dying (Protestant) King Edward as his successor to the throne – instead of his half-sister Mary as his father’s will decreed – his quick decision caused confusion for Jane’s succession, which was quickly overcome by Mary’s gathering forces and Naval support.  This fascinating children’s biography features full-page original illustrations, photographs of places she lived, and easy-to-understand text that conveys the gospel-values that Lady Jane held dear. The biography is based on documented facts and avoids the unsubstantiated myths that have woven themselves around Jane (such as the story of the cruel parents). Finalist at the 2013 San Diego Awards Association.”

 

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 Meet the Author(s):

 

Gospel for Real Life Jerry Bridges:  Born in Tyler, Texas in 1929, Dr. Bridges, speaker and staff member of the Navigators since 1955 and a remarried widower, has been writing solid, clear, and deep but easily understood Christian books since 1978.  Dr. Bridges was a U.S. Navy officer during the Korean War and is author of ~ 20 books, some of which are now classics of Christian living / doctrine, drawn from the deep historic wells and reservoirs of Scripture and Reformed writings.  Among his very helpful works are “The Gospel for Real Life” and “Holiness Day by Day” an outstanding daily devotional.   According to R.C. Sproul, a dean of American reformed theologians, “When Jerry Bridges speaks, I listen.”

 

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 Free Electronic / Online Resource(s):

 

Crossway is offering free 150 mb downloads of their ESV Global Study Bible (click here) – suitable for Kindle, Ipad, smartphones, computers, etc.  Also soon to be on free on Amazon Cloud / Kindle service.

 

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Click the links below for:

1) Main CDRC Library Page

2) All Library Media

3) Search By Title, Author, Publisher, etc.

4) Library Overview & Lending Info

5) Coram Deo Church Site

 

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Some books we are looking to add (from Riddelbarger’s site):

Basics of Reformed Thinking and Living:

Sacred Bond: Covenant Theology Explored, by Michael G. Brown, Zach Keele

An Unexpected Journey: Discovering Reformed Christianity, by W. Robert Godfrey

Introducing Covenant Theology, by Michael Horton

The Goldsworthy Trilogy: (Gospel and Kingdom, Gospel and Wisdom, The Gospel in Revelation), by Graeme Goldsworthy

A Better Way: Rediscovering the Drama of God-Centered Worship, by Michael Horton 

For Calvinism, by Michael S. Horton

Reformation Sketches: Insights into Luther, Calvin, and the Confessions, by W. Robert Godfrey

Debating Calvinism: Five Points, Two Views, by Dave Hunt, James White

The Potter’s Freedom: A Defense of the Reformation and the Rebuttal of Norman Geisler’s Choosen But Free, by James R. White

Tell the Truth: The Whole Gospel Wholly by Grace Communicated Truthfully and Lovingly, by Will Metzger 

Jesus Loves the Little Children: Why We Baptize Children, by Daniel R. Hyde

 

Creeds and Confessions:

Commentary of Dr. Zacharias Ursinus on the Heidelberg Catechism, by Z. Ursinus

The Church’s Book of Comfort, by Willem Spijker

Christs Churches Purely Reformed: A Social History of Calvinism, by Professor Philip Benedict

The Grace of Godliness: An Introduction to Doctrine and Piety in the Canons of Dort, by Matthew Barrett

Introduction to the Heidelberg Catechism, An: Sources, History, and Theology (Texts and Studies in Reformation and Post-Reformation Thought), by Lyle Bierma, Charles Gunnoe, Karin Maag

A Firm Foundation: An Aid to Interpreting the Heidelberg Catechism (Texts and Studies in Reformation and Post-Reformation Thought), by Caspar Olevianus, Lyle D. Bierma

Belgic Confession, The: Its History and Sources (Texts and Studies in Reformation and Post-Reformation Thought), by Nicolaas Gootjes

Our Only Comfort : A Comprehensive Commentary on the Heidelberg Catechism(2 Volume Set), by Fred H. Klooster

The Duke of Alba, by Henry Kamen

The Tailor-King: The Rise and Fall of the Anabaptist Kingdom of Muenster, by Anthony Arthur

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